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BARNBURGH ST PETER

Amazing architectureGlorious green men & gargoylesMagnificent memorialsSpectacular stained glassInteresting churchyardLink with famous peopleInterpretation of site available

Since around 1150, the honey-coloured Yorkshire stone church and tower of St Peters has been welcoming people to Barnburgh. Come and visit our lovely village church.

People have lived in this area for over 4000 years and there was probably a wooden Anglo-Saxon church on this site before the present building. The Domesday Book of 1086 mentions a Saxon Oswulf owning land in Barnburgh under Earl Harold prior to the Norman Conquest. The lowest section of this tower is the earliest part of the church and there is an original Norman window. There are five bells including the treble bell dating from 1490.

St Peters is the church of the Cat and Man Legend. The porch, dating from 1330 is reputed to be the place where “The cat killed the man and the man killed the cat”. Details of this fascinating local legend can be found at the church.

There are many interesting things to see here, including a plainly carved 12th century Norman font and the remains of a Saxon or Norman Cross found buried in the churchyard.

St Peters is home to the Cresacre Chapel, with its beautifully carved wooden screen (12th century). There is a magnificent 15th century stone tomb of Sir Percival Cresacre, featuring an oak effigy on the tomb has been dated a century earlier and may be of Sir Thomas Cresacre. It is reputed to be one of the best 14th century wooden statues in England. There are also portraits of the Cresacre family.

If you know anything more about the heritage of this site and would like us to include it here please contact us.

VISITING ST PETER

Tours for groups and schoolsGenerally accessible to wheelchair usersParking at Church or nearbyAccessible by public transportToilets at site or nearby

Address: St Peter’s Church, Barnburgh, Doncaster, DN5 7ET

Opening Times: Since around 1150, the honey-coloured Yorkshire stone church and tower of St Peters has been welcoming friends and visitors alike to enter its doors. Now, in the 21st century, the welcome is warm and friendly to anyone who wishes to explore the splendours of the building. The tower is the earliest part of the church, the lowest section contains an original Norman window. There are five bells including the treble bell dating from 1490. St Peters is home to the Cresacre Chapel, with its beautifully carved wooden screen (12th century). The chapel was endowed by the Cresacre family, who lived at Barnburgh Hall for over 350 years. There is a magnificent 15th century stone tomb of Sir Percival Cresacre, featuring an oak effigy on the tomb has been dated a century earlier and may be of Sir Thomas Cresacre. His head rests on a cushion, his legs are crossed to indicate that he has been to the Holy Land, and there is a lion at his feet. It is reputed to be one of the best 14th century wooden statues in England. There are also portraits of the Cresacre family. On the south wall of the chancel is a plaque commemorating the death of Alice, wife of George Mompasson, who was son of William Mompasson heroic Rector of Eyam during the great plague. In 1330 the Bella Aqua chapel was built. The Bella Aqua family lived just outside the village, and endowed this part of the church as their private chapel. Their ancestors came over with William the Conqueror. St Peters is the church of the Cat and Man Legend. The porch, dating from 1330 is reputed to be the place where “The cat killed the man and the man killed the cat”. Details of this fascinating local legend can be found at the church. There are many interesting things to see here, including a plainly carved 12th century Norman font and the remains of a Saxon or Norman Cross found buried in the churchyard. Each face has interesting carvings, including a Bishop with a mitre. If you know anything more about the heritage of this site and would like us to include it here please contact us.

Contact: 01709 892598

Directions: A1(M) J36. Follow signs into Mexborough. At 2nd roundabout turn left. After houses take 2nd right. In Barnburgh turn left on Church Lane.

Grid Reference: SE 484 032 GB Grid

GOOGLE MAP LINK

http://www.barnburghandharlington.co.uk

The text has been written by volunteers from the site, more information can be found when you visit in person.

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Barnburgh St Peter HODs

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